Keeping (relatively)positive

Previously, I’ve written about my thoughts as a writer in lockdown, when I was finding it difficult to write. My muse had obviously been scrolling through it, and decided to take pity on me, because the drive to create has returned to some degree. My fourth novel Sight Unseen has been published into a strange, sad new world. I want to take this opportunity to thank Agent Jenny, as always, and my publisher Birlinn/Polygon. Everyone there is working so hard in difficult circumstances to get those books out.

We were aided GREATLY by Kelly Lacey, Jacky Collins (AKA Dr Noir!) and a legion of fantastic bloggers and influencers who managed to get the Sight Unseen word out. If you need help with your literary endeavours, please look up Love Books Tours and Honey and Stag Literary Events. Heartfelt thanks to them all.

So, Book 2 of the Sarah Sutherland series Last Seen (set partially in India) and an outline for Book 3 (set in places  I think I’ll be able to get to) are now complete. I’m just thinking about all those shiny new books that were published this summer, sitting hopefully in bookshops nationwide, longing for readers. I also know how difficult it is to persuade ourselves to try and resume a ‘normal’ life.

With the latest new restrictions, life looks set to shrink even further. I go for a coffee with friends just once a week, but since we’re from four separate households, that looks likely to be a casualty. However, being home alone has led to some interesting observations. While I’m missing all the literary events I used to attend, I’m enjoying a break from the almost-constant anxiety of speaking in public and ‘putting myself out there’. I think this will resonate with many writers, yet when we talk about mental health, we tend to skim over this. I always tell my creative writing students that sharing your work with an audience is ‘something you’ll get used to’ because that’s what we tell ourselves, but writers are generally a shy, insecure bunch. As much as I miss the interaction with readers, this breathing space has definitely made me feel a lot calmer.

I don’t have any answers for what’s happening to us, but I’ll share with you some of the little things that are getting me through this and it might help you too:

  • That first gulp of fresh air whenever you take of your face mask
  • Sitting in my porch and pretending it’s a conservatory
  • Fairy lights/lights in bottles/tealights. In Reykjavik, they chase away the dark with lights in trees, lights on the water. My memories of Iceland are not of dark and cold, but of golden reflections.
  • Tea (always and obviously) in a favourite mug, and taken outside. It’s portable.
  • Watching the sea instead of a screen.
  • Going out for a walk just as it’s getting light.
  • Hearty east coast dwellers who greet you with ‘Quite fresh, today!’ when we’re in the middle of a named storm.
  • Other people’s dogs. They look so happy.
  • Discovering really cool stuff in my neighbourhood.
  • Doing yoga/meditating online (Huge thanks to the Space to BE community- I recommend)
  • Experiencing cacao (look it up, creatives, or do a course with Alchemy of Love)
  • Friends and family checking in with each other
  • Love/hate Zoom. It’s a lifeline, but wearying, and no substitute for real people in real settings.

Wishing you joy in the little things today xx


An Indian Adventure

There are times when you just have to pinch yourself. Hurtling through the Kolkata traffic in the back of a crazy yellow taxi, in the company of top literary agent Jenny Brown, acclaimed crime writer Lin Anderson, and Esha Chatterjee, my Indian publisher, has to be one of those times!

We were on our way to the  Kolkata Book Fair (the world’s largest) for the launch of the Indian edition of Bone Deep at the British Council Pavilion and a whirlwind of panel discussions. Such a far cry from Carnoustie, I think I can be forgiven for thinking I’d stepped into someone else’s reality!

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It all began with an invitation to the Mathrubhumi International Festival of Letters, in Kerala. Never having visited India before, this was an incredible opportunity, and I couldn’t have wished for better travelling companions. Jenny and Lin have both visited India several times before, to promote Scotland’s biggest crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, and to foster links between Scottish and Indian authors. None of us knew what to expect from MBIFL, now in its second year, but I think it’s fair to say we were overwhelmed by the warmth of our welcome, the attention to detail and the wonderful touches which have made the Mathrubhumi Festival such a huge hit with everyone who attended.

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The Festival was entirely plastic-free. Even our delegate badges were cardboard, and each speaker was given an aluminium water bottle, and a jute bag. The programme was varied and far-reaching; such a mix of current topics, with creatives from five continents. We met so many interesting people- my TBR pile has tripled! But how valuable to be exposed to writing from outside one’s normal experience. Three cheers for the wonderful volunteers who plied us with the most delicious juices (cucumber juice is amazing!) and hot, sweet chai.

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Our lovely helpers! MBIFL 2019

When the day’s business came to an end, we were treated to dinner beneath the stars. You can do that in Kerala!

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After four days in our Mathrubhumi bubble, we had to say a sad farewell, and it was on to Kolkata to meet Esha Chatterjee from Bee Books. Esha also publishes the Bloody Scotland anthology, and the novels of Graeme Macrae Burnet (all fantastic reads). We visited Jadavpur University Press and met some very talented and enthusiastic publishing students.

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Esha, Jenny, Lin and myself, with Sujata Sen at the Sienna Cafe, Kolkata

A walking tour around Kolkata is a must, especially in the company of Ritwick from Calcutta Walks. He is so knowledgeable, four hours spent exploring the old byways of the city went by in a flash. He also knows the very best places to buy masala chai and the tastiest samosas!

Back home in chilly Scotland, our Indian adventure certainly feels like a dream, but it must have happened- we have photos to prove it!

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Also can’t believe I met up with these two on the other side of the world! Thank you Calum and Georgie for flying in from Cambodia xxx